It’s Not Common Cent$: A 30-Day Personal Finance Crash Course for College Students and Young Adults by Aaminah Amin

As a millennial – and every generation after – it’s near impossible to have a straight talk about our finances. We didn’t get much training in it, and we’ve been hit by one life-changing event after another. It feels like they’re happening every day. So what are we to do?…

Unbound Feet by Judy Yung x A Larger Memory by Ronald T. Takaki

Happy Lunar New Year, one and all. May the Year of the Tiger bless you and your family this year. In celebration of this event, I’m sharing a review of the books Unbound Feet: A Social History of Chinese Women in San Francisco by Judy Yung and A Larger Memory:…

Lady Be Good: The Life and Times of Dorothy Hale by Pamela Hamilton

I thought the book was well-written, but I wasn’t on board with the pace of how things happened. I get that this was a fictional telling of a real woman’s life, presented as such from the beginning. However, it was hard for me to keep the details straight. I couldn’t…

Be a J.E.D.I. Leader, Not a Boss: Leadership in the Era of Corporate Social Justice, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion by Omar L. Harris

Although I haven’t read Harris’ previous book, The Servant Leader’s Manifesto (affiliate link), I would consider Be a J.E.D.I. Leader, Not a Boss to be a spiritual sequel. His corporate background informs his argument about where corporate interests can grow in a way that serves their employees and their stakeholders,…

The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton

The novel was published in 1920 about 1870s New York society. It’s fascinating how one look, one casual phrase, could destroy a person’s entire reputation. I think that’s still true, but we can start over somewhere else and bounce back for the most part. If someone is ruined (the Beauforts,…

Remember Me by Mary Higgins Clark

When I was a little Gilly, my Ma got roped into a Reader’s Digest Condensed Books subscription. This novel appeared in vol. 217 in 1995 when I was 12. I didn’t have the luxury of attending the library often as a child. Going to the library was a treat because…

Zen in the Art of Writing by Ray Bradbury

I bestowed Ray Bradbury with the honorary tile of being the grandfather of my literary aesthetic: cinematic absurdist. I found an essay (an interview, really) in this book where he states “All my stories are cinematic. … I may be the most cinematic novelist in the country today. All of…