As someone whose job is to write things, it may seem odd that I’m offering this list. However, I’m not the type of person who looks for the negative in everything. It always seems to find me, though.

When you first start out, you have to carefully consider your goals with the story. What are you trying to say? Should you be aiming for a happy ending, or does your character simply exist to have a good time and there’s no moral to the story? You have to be practical and realistic as the author in charge of their world.

You have to know that there will be ups and downs and to keep readers on your side, your character should suffer setbacks and disappointments. But, if you have a generous heart, enjoy frolicking in their world, and don’t have a completely unrealistic ending, then why are you telling this story right now?

Being upbeat always brings out a specific type of voice in us as writers. But what if you wanted a fresh way to look at the word itself? That’s what this list is all about.

Sometimes, vivacious isn’t the way to look at a character’s motivations. It would be best if you always pushed yourself to see it from their point of view, which might not necessarily be yours.

I suppose you could make an argument that you have to be positive to write a positive character. I’m sure that’s a common practice among some writers. However, I feel that could have a detrimental effect on the quality of content they produce and is counterproductive in terms of getting the words on the page.

I’m not of the school that you need to be in love to write about love.

What do you think?

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As a writer, I spend a lot of time describing things, and I’m always looking for new and exciting ways to do it. Through my research and experimentation, I have found that narrating sounds can be a powerful tool to describe a scene or set the tone of a work.

Narrating sounds is the easiest way to improve the vividness of your descriptions. I feel it adds a lot of subtle richness to your writing. But, of course, you should always use words that sound natural in the world of your story.

Writing about sounds can be easy or difficult depending on how you approach it. I hope that the prompts I gave here will help you write more vivid stories with sounds that come alive.

If you still have a morning commute, I find that being alone in your thoughts while going through the motions is an educational opportunity to work on your novel, poem, or screenplay by making you more observant. There are myriad sounds that you can work with and name on your own. Who knows, you might even come up with a word that’s not on this list.

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You don’t want to reveal too much about your character in the first chapter. However, I am of the firm belief that if you write an excellent first chapter, the rest of the story will fall into place. Then, when you get into chapter two, you can delve into a character’s background and give little hints to the reader of what they are like in the story’s context.

Even something as simple as describing their voice can set the perfect scene in the mind’s eye of a reader.

It isn’t easy to describe a voice in a story without sounding cliché or overdramatic. So, I thought I would make a list of 41 possible words to describe a voice.

  1. adenoidal
  2. appealing
  3. breathing
  4. brittle
  5. croaky
  6. dead
  7. disembodied
  8. flat
  9. fruity
  10. grating
  11. gravelly
  12. gruff
  13. guttural
  14. high-pitched
  15. hoarse
  16. honeyed
  17. husky
  18. low
  19. matter-of-fact
  20. monotonous
  21. nasal
  22. orotund
  23. penetrating
  24. plummy
  25. quietly
  26. raucous
  27. ringing
  28. shrill
  29. silvery
  30. singsong
  31. small
  32. smoky
  33. strangled
  34. strident
  35. taut
  36. thin
  37. throaty
  38. tight
  39. tremulous
  40. wheezy
  41. wobbly

Stories are made unique by the voices of their authors. The way you tell a story, the words you use, the cadence, the inflection all contribute to the story. Think about the voices of the people in the story as the author. How do they sound? How do they speak? Do you want them to sound like you or someone you know? How do you want them to talk in the tone of the story?

In summary, I found these phrases exciting and will be using some of them in my works. Imagine using “honeyed” instead of “ingratiating.” For example:

“The sound of his honeyed voice made her skin crawl.”

This is the kind of thing that makes for good reading.

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There is a lot of advice out there to help writers improve their craft and become better writers. Some of this advice is good, some tips are wonderful, and some are downright awful. The Artist’s Way is a tool, not a system; it’s a book to help you find what works best for you. This course provides a solid foundation to get you started.

When you get the book, one of the first things you read is a promise that you make to yourself.

I’m providing them here for you as a checklist. It’s something that’s helped me over the years, and I feel confident it’ll help you too.

  1. Creativity is the natural order of life. Life is energy; pure creative energy.
  2. There is an underlying, in-dwelling creative force infusing all of life – including ourselves.
  3. When we open ourselves to our creativity, we open ourselves to the creator’s creativity within us and our lives.
  4. We are ourselves, creations. And we, in turn, are meant to continue creativity by being creative ourselves.
  5. Creativity is god’s gift to us. Using our creativity is our gift back to God.
  6. The refusal to be creative itself will and is counter to our true nature.
  7. When we open ourselves to exploring our creativity, we open ourselves to God: good, orderly direction.
  8. As we open our creative channel to the creator, many gentle but powerful changes are to be expected.
  9. It is safe to open ourselves up to greater and greater creativity.
  10. Our creative dreams and yearning come from a divine source. As we move towards our dreams, we move towards our divinity.

“The Artist’s Way” is a guided experience to help you understand your creative process, learn to work through your fears, and develop the qualities of a successful artist. It is also a multi-level course that will give you practical tools to improve every area of your life.

In conclusion, it doesn’t matter what the book says; the important thing is to do it. The book itself is not the answer, but it can be a powerful tool if it gets you to make the introspective journey inward. It is not a book for everyone, but it is a book that can help everyone.

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