Craft Talk

The one where I meet my thesis instructor for the first time

In case you haven’t realized, I’ve been sharing some old posts from Raconteuse that are writing-related the last few Wednesdays. I think they’re relevant to what I’m trying to achieve here with Writeropolis, and I hope that you enjoy what’s here.

Her feedback was vital. I’ve been jumping the gun too much about the cinematic lens in my stories. I’m more worried about bringing forth the cinematic part of my craft to remember that I still have a story to tell. I’ve gotten that feedback before (film geek for life!) and while I cherish it, it’s also been working against me. 

She advised me straight up that I need to let go of controlling the story so much. I never knew I did that. I’m glad she called me on it. I’ve learned quite a bit about how my craft works in front of an audience because the workshop is essential.

But I don’t like the setup. You’re not allowed to speak when people are critiquing your work. You sit there, take your punches and edit the holy shit out of it. I definitely want a more collaborative nature in a workshop. Besides, it’s not like I have to incorporate everything they bash me on. But by asking questions during the session I can gauge where the story should go. 

It’s like they say: “All advice is autobiographical.” It’s so much easier to ding someone else for your own sins than to see them when they’re in you. 

I oftentimes have a hell of a time ending a story. It never comes naturally, it just sort of dies. I often know where I want a story to end BUT I never know when to walk away so it tends to end abruptly. I’m like “fuck it, I’m done with you. Blahhhh.” And I’m not doing the story justice.

There’s this rich, cinematic movie that plays in my head when I write. All I want to do is capture that in the story. But the actual craft of the story is lost in the process. So I definitely need to fine-tune my style that way. I’m simply too excited to share the movies in my head to focus on the story part.

She said my strengths were my humor, how I give away clues to move the story along in my dialogue and how “voice-y” I am. I’ve gotten that feedback before but it’s nice to be reminded.

Well, it’s true what they say. Writing is a very solitary career. I want to see what’s going on in the world, and not just in my head or on the page.

write on, Guilliean
write on, Guilliean

Join the guest list.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.